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Category: Heat Treatment-Ferritic, Aust. & Duplex

  1. Ambient temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

    BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The ambient temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof strength, tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area and impact (charpy) strength in the finally heat treated condition. Specified hardness levels for the steels for subsequent quenching and tempering (1.4923 1.4938 and 1.4913) in their delivery condition are also included.

  2. Effect of cold work and heat treatment on the magnetic permeability of austenitic stainless steels

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally non-magnetic with relative magnetic permeabilities of around 1.0. Cold working can partially transform the austenitic phase to martensite, leading to higher magnetic permeabilities, for example at sharp corners, sheared edges or machined surfaces. The increase in permeability can be reversed by full solution annealing.

  3. Elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

    BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof, tensile and impact (charpy) strengths.

  4. Elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10272

    BS EN 10272 is the material standard for stainless steel bars for pressure purposes. The elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof, tensile and impact (charpy) strengths. Generally, the grades included have the same chemical compositions as bar grades specified in BS EN 10088-3, which also tabulates their ambient temperature mechanical properties. The exception is grade 1.4951 which was added in the 2007 edition of the spec. Recommended annealing heat treatment temperatures for the steels covered are also tabulated.

  5. Elevated temperature mechanical properties for stainless steels specified in BS EN 10028-7

    PLEASE NOTE THAT PREVIOUS VERSIONS OF THIS ARTICLE HAD A SIGNIFICANT ERROR IN THE VALUES SHOWN FOR PROOF STRENGTHS OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS. THE PRESENT ARTICLE HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY REVISED TO REFLECT THE VALUES GIVEN IN THE STANDARD. Design tensile stress values at temperatures up to 550°C are tabulated for all ferritic, martensitic and duplex types covered in the BS EN 10028-7 standard. Space limits the range of austenitic grades that can be conveniently displayed and so only a selection of some of the more 'common' the austenitic grade properties are included. Recommended annealing heat treatment temperatures for the steels covered are also tabulated.

  6. Fabricating Duplex Stainless Steel

    Duplex Stainless Steels are growing at a high rate. It is important to understand how they differ from the more familiar stainless steels and how these differences affect the fabrication methods and parameters 

  7. Heat tint (temper) colours on stainless steel surfaces heated in air

    A colour chart is shown for guidance on exposure temperatures on 1.4301 (304) type. The factors affecting the degree or depth of colours formed are outlined. These include steel composition, atmosphere, time and surface finish.

  8. Heat treatment of stainless steels for spring applications

    Heat treatment (tempering) of austenitic strip and wire grades for enhanced mechanical properties is referenced in BSEN 10151 (strip) and BSEN 10270-3 (wire).

  9. Stress relieving heat treatments for austenitic stainless steels

    Austenitic stainless steels are not hardenable by heat treatment as no phase changes occur on heating or cooling. Softening is done by heating in the 1050 / 1120C range, ideally followed by rapid cooling. For many applications, final stress relieving austenitic stainless steel products is not normally needed. Stress relieving removes residual tensile stresses and so improves the SCC resistance. The risk of distortion can be reduced during forming or machining operations by stress relieving.

  10. Surface hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steels with Nitrogen

    This article summarises the proprietary surface hardening processes Stainihard and Stainitec

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