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Category: Stress/Strain & Work Hardening

  1. Cutting and profiling techniques for stainless steels

    Stainless steel can be cut and profiled in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that tool/machinery capability and rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for sawing, shearing, plasma cutting, blanking, punching and piercing are discussed.

  2. Effect of austenitic stainless steel composition and heat treatment on cold formability

    The influence of nickel content on deep drawing and stretch forming capability in austenitic grades 304, 305 and 316 are discussed. The affects on magnetic permeability and 'orange peel' after forming are mentioned.

  3. Forming techniques for stainless steel (1) bending

    Stainless steel can be formed in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that power and tool/machinery rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for bending flat material and tubes are discussed.

  4. Forming techniques for stainless steel (2) drawing and spinning

    Stainless steel can be formed in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that tool/machinery capability and rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for drawing and spinning are discussed.

  5. Mechanism and measurement of work hardening of austenitic stainless steels during plastic deformation

    Austenitic stainless steels work-harden significantly during cold working. During cold deformation some martensite is formed, which makes the steel slightly ferro-magnetic. The work hardening coefficient, 'n', and the anisotropy index or strain ratio 'r' are outlined.

  6. Specifying stainless steel for spring applications

    BSEN 10151 (strip) and BSEN 10272-3 (wire) for springs are outlined. The grades in each standard are tabulated and compared to the BS5770-4 and BS2056 which they replace, where grades such as 301S21 301S81 302S26 302S25 and 305S11 were specified. Grades listed include 1.4016 1.4021 1.4028 1.4031 1.4568 (17/7 PH type) 1.4310 1.4301 1.4401 1.4369 1.4372 and 1.4568 Mechanical properties in the cold worked (temper rolled for strip, drawn for wire) conditions are shown. Heat treated properties for precipitation hardening grade 1.4568 wire are also shown.

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