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Category: Mechanical Fastening

  1. Austenitic stainless steel for timber fixings

    Austenitic stainless steels have excellent resistance to corrosion by acetic acid emitted by wood. They are NHBC recommended for a range of fasteners and fixings in timber. For use in immersed timber, the choice of grade depends on the specific water conditions, including chloride level and flow rate. Careful grade selection is also required for fixings in timber in swimming pool buildings.

  2. Causes of metal corrosion in timber fixings

    The moisture level in timber is the most important factor in determining the incidence of corrosion. Above a threshold moisture level, wood is always acidic due to the breakdown of wood cellulose to acetic acid. Applied chemical treatments to the timber or exposure in a marine environment can increase the corrosion risk.

  3. Comparison of composition ranges of 316 type stainless steels

    This article compares the chemical composition of a number of 316 type grades as covered by the now superseded BS1449 and BS970 and their replacement, BS EN 10088 Parts 2 and 3. Grades covered include 316S11 316S12 316S13 316S16 316S31 316S33 and European steel numbers 1.4401 1.4404 1.4432 and 1.4436

  4. Factors affecting wear and galling

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Severe galling can result in seizure of metal components. The key factors affecting the tendancy for galling are design tolerances and the surface finish, hardness and microstrucure of the metals in contact.

  5. Galling resistance of stainless steels

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Austenitic and precititation hardening stainless steels have poor resistance to galling. Hardenable martensitic stainless steels have better galling resistance. The galling characteristics of duplex stainless steels is thought to be similar to that of austenitic stainless steels.

  6. Improving wear and galling resistance of stainless steels

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Lubrication in improves galling resistance. A solid lubrication system such as a PTFE coating gives better galling resistance than greases. Altering the surface characteristics by nitriding or chromium plating also improves wear and galling resistance.

  7. Shear and Tension Capacity of stainless steel bolts

    This article covers how to design stainless steel bolts (fasteners) subject to shear and tension forces. Shear and tension capacities for bolts of property class 50, 70 and 80 from diameter M10 to M24 are given. (207)

  8. Tightening torques for stainless steel bolts

    Maximum breaking torque values for property class 50, 70 and 80 austenitic fastener grades A1, A2, A3 A4 and A5 taken from BS EN ISO 3506-1 are shown. A link is provided to the Bulten Stainless web site where maximum tightening torque, yield load and failure load for austenitic stainless steel fasteners are tabulated.

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