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Category: Mechanical & Physical Properties

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  1. On-site methods for stainless steel grade product sorting

    Guidance on methods for sorting stainless steels from low alloy and carbon steels is shown. These include physical (colour, density, magnetic) and mechanical (hardness) properties and chemical tests (copper sulphate, copper chloride, nitric acid and sulphur tests). A suggested approach to a step-by-step procedure for differentiating stainless steels from carbon steels is tabulated. These methods have not been verified by the BSSA, who take no responsibility for their accuracy of the conclusions reached on steel types.

  2. Selection of stainless steels for cryogenic applications

    Ferritic, martensitic and duplex stainless steels tend to become brittle as the temperature is reduced, in a similar way to other ferritic / martensitic steels. The austenitics stainless steels such as 304(1.4301) and 316(1.4401) are however 'tough' at cryogenic temperatures and can be classed a 'cryogenic steels'. The toughness of the austenitics relies on their fcc atomic structure. Ferrite or martenite phases in austenitic weld metal or castings can affect the suitability for cryogenic applications. Charpy impact tests are done to assess the toughness of materials.

  3. Sparking risks in explosive gas atmospheres

    Stainless steels cannot be regarded as 'spark free' where there could be a risk of gas ignition by frictional contact. Although the corrosion resistance of stainless steels is better then plain carbon (mild steel), their frictional sparking characteristics and their explosive gas ignition risk is no better. This based on work done by the Health and Safety Laboratory of the Health and Safety Executive at Buxton, UK, in 1995.

  4. Specifying stainless steel for spring applications

    BSEN 10151 (strip) and BSEN 10272-3 (wire) for springs are outlined. The grades in each standard are tabulated and compared to the BS5770-4 and BS2056 which they replace, where grades such as 301S21 301S81 302S26 302S25 and 305S11 were specified. Grades listed include 1.4016 1.4021 1.4028 1.4031 1.4568 (17/7 PH type) 1.4310 1.4301 1.4401 1.4369 1.4372 and 1.4568 Mechanical properties in the cold worked (temper rolled for strip, drawn for wire) conditions are shown. Heat treated properties for precipitation hardening grade 1.4568 wire are also shown.

  5. Stainless Steel Grades Datasheets

    Summary of links to websites for download of stainless steel grade datasheets

  6. Structural design of stainless steel

    Basic design data for the grades of stainless steel typically used in structural applications are presented. This includes design strength (py), expressed as the specified proof strength, Young's modulus (modulus of elasiticity), Poissons ratio, shear modulus, density, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and heat capacity. Brief guidance on designing structural stainless steel is also given, where the differences between carbon steel and stainless steel's buckling resistance and member deflections are explained. Grades listed include type 304 304L 316 316L and 2205, European steel grades 1.4301 1.4307 1.4401 1.4404 1.4462 duplex (141)

  7. Working with Stainless Steels

    The importance of good design and surface finish selection for the successful fabrication of stainless steel is outlined along with some of the properties that can affect the fabrication and performance of stainless steels. These include thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient and the risks of galling (pick-up).The hazard of iron contamination from carbon steel pick-up is mentioned and that welding oxide or heat treatment scale should be removed prior to service.

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