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Category: Mechanical & Physical Properties

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  1. Elevated temperature physical properties of stainless steels

    Youngs modulus and thermal expansion data is tabulated for a range of commonly used grades shown in BS EN 10088-1. More detailed 'typical' data follows for austenitic steel types only from the INCO publication 'Austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steels-engineering properties at elevated temperatures', including tensile and shear modulus data, Poisson's ratio, density, thermal expansion, conductivity, specific heat and electrical resistivity.

  2. Factors affecting wear and galling

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Severe galling can result in seizure of metal components. The key factors affecting the tendancy for galling are design tolerances and the surface finish, hardness and microstrucure of the metals in contact.

  3. Fatigue properties and endurance limits of stainless steels

    Fatigue is a process of mechanical failure resulting from the application of repeated cyclic stresses. Stainless steels exhibit a 'fatigue limit' or 'endurance limit' during cyclic stressing. As a general rule austenitic and duplex stainless steels stainless have fatigue limits in air around their tensile 0.2% proof strength levels. Corrosion and thermal fatigue are also covered.

  4. Fire resistance rating and testing of stainless steels

    Stainless steels do not have an intrinsic 'fire rating'. Tests to assess fire resistance are performed on specific fabrications under precise conditions to BS476 parts 20, 21 (load-bearing elements) and 22 (non-load-bearing elements). Fire tests results on some specific products demonstrate the good fire resisting properties of stainless steels in building and ship bulkhead applications. (186)

  5. Forming techniques for stainless steel (1) bending

    Stainless steel can be formed in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that power and tool/machinery rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for bending flat material and tubes are discussed.

  6. Forming techniques for stainless steel (2) drawing and spinning

    Stainless steel can be formed in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that tool/machinery capability and rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for drawing and spinning are discussed.

  7. Frictional properties of stainless steels

    Coefficients of friction are more dependent on surface rather than material properties. Surface finish, cleanliness and lubrication of the mating surfaces largely determine the actual frictional resistance between mating surfaces. Surface finish, mating tolerances and lubrication play an important role in preventing galling and seizure.

  8. Galling and Galling Resistance of Stainless Steels

    Galling (cold welding) is a form of severe adhesive wear. The mechanism is briefly described. Soft very ductile austenitic stainless steel types tend to gall or seize where high stresses and poor lubrication are present. The factors affecting galling are covered, particularly design tolerances, surface finish, hardness and microstructure. Selection of grades to avoid galling covers Nitronic 32 and Nitronic 60 types. Fasteners to BSENISO 3506 with property classes 70 and 80 are also mentioned. The galling characteristics of duplex stainless steels is claimed by one US manufacturer to be similar to austenitic stainless steels. Methods for reducing galling tendency are discussed and include lubrication, nitriding and hard chromium plating.

  9. Galling resistance of stainless steels

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Austenitic and precititation hardening stainless steels have poor resistance to galling. Hardenable martensitic stainless steels have better galling resistance. The galling characteristics of duplex stainless steels is thought to be similar to that of austenitic stainless steels.

  10. Hardness test methods and hardness conversion tables

    Hardness testing methods, including Brinell, Vickers and Rockwell are outlined. The hardness scales, including HB HV HRB and HRC are shown for each method and a comparison table of hardness values between these scales presented.

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