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Category: Mechanical & Physical Properties

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  1. Ambient temperature physical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10088-1

    Ambient temperature physical properties, including density, modulus of elasticity (Young's modulus), coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, specific heat (heat content or heat capacity) and electrical resistivity for a range of ferritic, martensitic, austenitic and duplex stainless steel types are tabulated. Some explanation of the units used for these properties is given.

  2. Calculating the deflections of stainless steel beams

    The stiffness of a stainless steel component varies with the stress level, the stiffness decreasing as the stress level increases. Consequently deflections are greater in stainless steel beams than in carbon steel beams. This article explains how to calculate the deflection in a stainless steel beam. (206)

  3. Comparison of structural design in stainless steel and carbon steel

    This article highlights the differences between designing structural components in carbon steel to those in stainless steel. The stress-strain behaviour and mechanical properties are compared and the implications on structural behaviour described. (205)

  4. Composition effects on the magnetic permeability of austenitic stainless steels

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally non-magnetic with relative magnetic permeabilities of around 1.0. Permeabilities above 1.0 are associated with the amount of either ferrite or martensite phases present in the 'austenitic' steel. Additions of nickel and nitrogen stabilise the austenitic phase, whereas molybdenum, titanium and niobium stabilise ferrite. All elements stabilise austenitic steels to the effect of cold work producing martensite.

  5. Cutting and profiling techniques for stainless steels

    Stainless steel can be cut and profiled in the same way and using the same type of equipment as for most types of steel. The high work hardening rates of austenitic stainless steels means that tool/machinery capability and rigidity requirements are higher than for carbon steels. The techniques for sawing, shearing, plasma cutting, blanking, punching and piercing are discussed.

  6. Effect of austenitic stainless steel composition and heat treatment on cold formability

    The influence of nickel content on deep drawing and stretch forming capability in austenitic grades 304, 305 and 316 are discussed. The affects on magnetic permeability and 'orange peel' after forming are mentioned.

  7. Effect of cold work and heat treatment on the magnetic permeability of austenitic stainless steels

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally non-magnetic with relative magnetic permeabilities of around 1.0. Cold working can partially transform the austenitic phase to martensite, leading to higher magnetic permeabilities, for example at sharp corners, sheared edges or machined surfaces. The increase in permeability can be reversed by full solution annealing.

  8. Elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

    BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof, tensile and impact (charpy) strengths.

  9. Elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10272

    BS EN 10272 is the material standard for stainless steel bars for pressure purposes. The elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof, tensile and impact (charpy) strengths. Generally, the grades included have the same chemical compositions as bar grades specified in BS EN 10088-3, which also tabulates their ambient temperature mechanical properties. The exception is grade 1.4951 which was added in the 2007 edition of the spec. Recommended annealing heat treatment temperatures for the steels covered are also tabulated.

  10. Elevated temperature mechanical properties for stainless steels specified in BS EN 10028-7

    PLEASE NOTE THAT PREVIOUS VERSIONS OF THIS ARTICLE HAD A SIGNIFICANT ERROR IN THE VALUES SHOWN FOR PROOF STRENGTHS OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS. THE PRESENT ARTICLE HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY REVISED TO REFLECT THE VALUES GIVEN IN THE STANDARD. Design tensile stress values at temperatures up to 550°C are tabulated for all ferritic, martensitic and duplex types covered in the BS EN 10028-7 standard. Space limits the range of austenitic grades that can be conveniently displayed and so only a selection of some of the more 'common' the austenitic grade properties are included. Recommended annealing heat treatment temperatures for the steels covered are also tabulated.

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