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Category: Material Selection

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  1. BSSA Stainless Steel Sections Directory: Part 10 - Cold Formed Hollow Sections

    The Directory shows a comprehensive list of Cold Formed Hollow Sections available from UK suppliers. The directory gives a list of all of the standard section sizes for sections used in the manufacture of windows and door frames which are available, supplier details and a glossary of terms.

  2. BSSA Stainless Steel Sections Directory: Part 11 - Special Sections

    The Directory shows a comprehensive list of Special Sections available from UK suppliers. The directory gives a list of all of the standard section sizes for sections used in the manufacture of windows and door frames which are available, supplier details and a glossary of terms.

  3. Care and maintenance of stainless steel

    Stainless steels are highly durable, but in certain service conditions may stain or discolour due to surface deposits. In order to achieve maximum corrosion resistance and aesthetic appeal, stainless steel surfaces must be kept clean. Factors affecting maintenance are outlined. Recommendations on the frequency of cleaning for architectural applications are given.

  4. CARES Guide to Reinforcing Steels Part 1: The Product Certification Scheme for Steel for Reinforcement of Concrete

    The Product Certification Scheme for Steel for Reinforcement of Concrete. General description of the CARES certification scheme for reinforcing steel in the UK

  5. CARES Guide to Reinforcing Steels Part 7: Stainless Reinforcing Steels

    This guide is published by UK CARES, Sevenoakes, TN13 1XR. It outlines the benefits of using stainless steel for concrete reinforcement. These include decreases inspection and maintenance costs and extension of design life of structures at risk of reinforcement corrosion, compared with using carbon steel reinforcement. The specification these steels to BS 6744:2001 is outlined and guidance on the use of stainless reinforcing given. The CARES schemes for manufacturer quality management system approval and review are also discussed.

  6. Causes of metal corrosion in timber fixings

    The moisture level in timber is the most important factor in determining the incidence of corrosion. Above a threshold moisture level, wood is always acidic due to the breakdown of wood cellulose to acetic acid. Applied chemical treatments to the timber or exposure in a marine environment can increase the corrosion risk.

  7. Chemical composition and mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS 6744

    BS 6744 was originally published in 1986. A recent revision (2009) has introduced 2 new duplex grades. The current version now includes European steel grades (numbers in the standard) 1.4301 1.4436 1.4429 1.4162 1.4362 1.4462 1.4501 1.4529.The chemical composition of stainless steels covered in the this standard are shown along with the specified tensile properties for the 'grades' 200 500 and 650

  8. Cleaning methods for stainless steel

    A range of cleaning methods for stainless steel is described. Routine cleaning methods for light soiling (e.g. fingerprints, oil and grease marks, light rust staining) are given. These are followed by methods for cleaning stainless steel following vandalism, accident and neglect. (130)

  9. Common names for chemicals and selection of appropriate stainless steel grades

    Some chemical have both a 'scientific' and 'common' name, for example caustic soda is the common name for sodium hydroxide. Most corrosion table data uses the scientific names and so finding information can sometimes be difficult when only a common name is known. Reference is also made to alum, aqua fortis, aqua regia, bleach, caustic potash, chromic acid, ethanol and methanol (alcohol), glycol, gypsum, javelle (javel) water, Labarraque's solution, marine acid, muriatic acid, oil of vitriol, oleum, rock salt, salt acid, spirit of salt, sulphurated hydrogen and wood acid.

  10. Comparison of 304 or 316 and 304L or 316L type compositions and effect on corrosion resistance

    The carbon ranges of 'normal' and 'low' carbon 304 (304L) and 316 (316L) types are compared. The effect of carbon on intercystalline corrosion resistance and welding is also covered and why steel is often offered as a dual certified product. European grades 1.4301 1.4306 1.4307 1.4401 and 1.4404 are included in the comparisons.

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Office and Postal Address: BSSA, Regus, Blades Enterprise Centre, John Street, Sheffield S2 4SW

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