Contact BSSA

Category: Design & Design Strengths

Page 2 of 3

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  1. Elevated temperature physical properties of stainless steels

    Youngs modulus and thermal expansion data is tabulated for a range of commonly used grades shown in BS EN 10088-1. More detailed 'typical' data follows for austenitic steel types only from the INCO publication 'Austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steels-engineering properties at elevated temperatures', including tensile and shear modulus data, Poisson's ratio, density, thermal expansion, conductivity, specific heat and electrical resistivity.

  2. EN 1090 - A Guide for Stainless Steel

    A guide to EN 1090 for stainless steel related issues

  3. Factors affecting wear and galling

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Severe galling can result in seizure of metal components. The key factors affecting the tendancy for galling are design tolerances and the surface finish, hardness and microstrucure of the metals in contact.

  4. Galling resistance of stainless steels

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Austenitic and precititation hardening stainless steels have poor resistance to galling. Hardenable martensitic stainless steels have better galling resistance. The galling characteristics of duplex stainless steels is thought to be similar to that of austenitic stainless steels.

  5. General principles for selection of stainless steels

    The main factor in the selection process for stainless steels is corrosion resistance. Careful consideration of the application should be done to enable a choice of grade with suitable corrosion resistance whilst keeping costs to an economic minimum. Other considerations such as mechanical properties (strength and toughness), physical properties (magnetic permeability) and forming, fabrication and joining methods available should be secondary. (91)

  6. Grade selection to avoid localised forms of corrosion

    Appropriate grade selection is a balance between attaining adequate corrosion resistance, whilst minimising cost. Useful aids to material selection include the Outokumpu Stainless Corrosion Handbook and the Nickel Institute's Crevice Corrosion Engineering Guide.

  7. Improving wear and galling resistance of stainless steels

    Galling, sometimes known as cold welding, is a form of severe adhesive wear which can occur when two metals are in relative motion and under sufficient load to permit the transfer of material. Lubrication in improves galling resistance. A solid lubrication system such as a PTFE coating gives better galling resistance than greases. Altering the surface characteristics by nitriding or chromium plating also improves wear and galling resistance.

  8. Online Stainless Steel in Construction Information Centre

    The Online Stainless Steel in Construction Information Centre www.stainlessconstruction.com has become available.

  9. Removing Barriers to Good Design

    Paper delivered by Roger Sale at BSSA Conference 2000

  10. Resources for Architects

    This publication has been prepared by the BSSA for the RIBA CPD Providers Network. It lists sources of information from the BSSA website (articles and publications), the Nickel Institute, Steel Construction Institute, Euro Inox, Outokumpu, and the Australian and South African Stainless Steel Development Associations. These are grouped in topics that include Designing for Durability, Surface Finishes, Fabrication, Environmental Issues, Source of Supply, Architectural and Structural Applications.

Page 2 of 3

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

top

Office and Postal Address: BSSA, Regus, Blades Enterprise Centre, John Street, Sheffield S2 4SW

Registered Office: Pegasus House, 463A Glossop Road, Sheffield S10 2QD

Tel: +44 (0)114 292 2636    |     Email: admin@bssa.org.uk

Copyright © 2017 British Stainless Steel Association

web design sheffield by Llama Digital